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Leichhardt: the motivations of an explorer

Professor Rod Home, University of Melbourne

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Historian Rod Home looks at Ludwig Leichhardt’s family background, financial situation and formal scientific training to argue the explorer was also a perceptive naturalist with a well defined research agenda in Australia. NOTE: audio loops from 18:40 on.

Transcript

exploration, leichhardt, science

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Deepening the mystery: the 1938 South Australian government Leichhardt search party

Dr Philip Jones, South Australian Museum

Ludwig Leichhardt series, 15 June 2007

Historian Philip Jones re-examines evidence found in the Simpson Desert in 1938, which prompted a search for the Ludwig Leichhardt’s lost expedition. He argues the search party may have discovered an Aboriginal burial site.

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archaeology, exploration, indigenous, leichhardt

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Examining the intersections of historical research and fictional writing

Dr Lenore Coltheart, political historian, and author Frank Moorhouse

Historical Imagination series, 20 May 2007

The convergence of history and fiction and the power of archives and objects to inform their work on Australian women and the League of Nations is explored by political historian Lenore Coltheart and author Frank Moorhouse.

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art, museums, politics, ways of knowing, women

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Footprints in the sand: Banks’ Maori collection, Cook’s first voyage 1768-1771

Paul Tapsell, Auckland War Memorial Museum, New Zealand

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Historian Paul Tapsell discusses how artefacts in Joseph Banks’ collection from Captain James Cook’s first voyage to the Pacific can be viewed as ‘taonga’, or Maori treasured possessions.

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collection, cook, indigenous, museums, pacific

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Encounters with wondrous things: the historical significance of the Cook-Forster Collection

Professor Paul Turnbull, Griffith University

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

The historical significance of the Cook-Forster ethnographic collection of the University of Göttingen in Germany is examined by historian Paul Turnbull.

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collection, cook, museums, pacific

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Brushed with fame: museological investments in the Cook voyage collections

Lissant Bolton, British Museum, United Kingdom

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Historian Lissant Bolton considers the nature of Captain James Cook’s fame in a museological context and discusses how difficult it is to present artefacts from the Pacific in an exhibition without reference to Cook’s three voyages.

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collection, cook, museums, pacific

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Looking across the beach both ways

Professor Greg Dening, Australian National University

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Historian Greg Dening examines the cultural achievements of the Sea of Islands or Pacific peoples with a particular focus on Tupaia, a priest of Oro, who joined Captain James Cook on the Endeavour.

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cook, exploration, indigenous, pacific

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Discovering Cook: Georg Forster and the image of Captain Cook

Nigel Erskine, Australian National Maritime Museum

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Curator Nigel Erskine discusses the official account of Captain James Cook’s third Pacific voyage, particularly the introductory essay by German naturalist and fellow voyager Georg Forster.

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cook, exploration, pacific

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To attempt some new discoveries in that vast unknown tract

Professor Adrienne Kaeppler, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, United States

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Anthropologist Adrienne Kaeppler outlines the research that has gone into reconstructing the ethnographic collections from Captain James Cook’s three Pacific voyages.

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collection, cook, exploration, pacific

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Cook, his mission and Indigenous Australia: a perspective on consequence

Doreen Mellor, National Library of Australia

Captain James Cook series, 28 July 2006

Curator Doreen Mellor examines the life-changing consequences for Australian Indigenous peoples of Captain James Cook’s first Pacific journey, and subsequent European settlement, as the background to the story of the Stolen Generations.

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cook, exploration, indigenous

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