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Understanding Indigenous enterprise on Palm Island: Is resilience more than a metaphor?

Erin Bohensky (paper co-authored by Yiheyis Maru, James Butler, Thomas Stevens, and Kostas Alexandridis)

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Erin Bohensky applies resilience theory to a proposal for an aquaculture farm as a sustainable enterprise on Palm Island, North Queensland, and adds historical analysis and empirical insights from interviews and photographic surveys.

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economy, indigenous

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Animal spirits in the Dreaming and the market: The economic development of caring for country

Geoff Buchanan, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Are the Dreaming and the Market mutually exclusive? In economics as in anthropology, ‘animal spirits’ are understood to influence outcomes. Geoff Buchanan explores the hybrid economy (customary, market and state) in the context of caring for country.

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economy, indigenous, spirituality

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A financial scandal

Ros Kidd, historian and consultant

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

For seven decades the Queensland government intercepted Aboriginal people’s wages, child endowment, pensions, inheritances. It controlled their bank accounts, deducted fees, restricted withdrawals. This was wrong. What are the avenues for redress?

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crime, economy, indigenous

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Unfair pay: Tracing tracker wages in New South Wales, 1862–1950

Michael Bennett, historian, Native Title Service Corp

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Hundreds of Aboriginal men were employed as police trackers from 1862. They enjoyed a regular income, but the work was risky and the pay and conditions terrible. Michael Bennett describes the system and makes the case for a compensatory scheme.

economy, indigenous, work

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Options for developing a natural resource-based economy in Arnhem Land: Payments for environmental services

Nanni Concu, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Payments for Environmental Services (PES) are used to simultaneously tackle poverty and environmental degradation. Using data from two field sites, Nanni Concu talks about the potential of PES to promote a natural-resource-based economy in Arnhem Land.

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economy, environment, indigenous

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The 1968–69 introduction of equal wages for Aboriginal pastoral workers in the Kimberley

Fiona Skyring, consultant historian

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Challenging the idea that equal wages caused mass eviction and unemployment for Aboriginal people, Fiona Skyring looks at other factors such as how government investigations in 1965 and 1966 discouraged station owners from appropriating pension payments.

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economy, indigenous, industry, work

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Workfare, welfare and the hybrid economy: The Western Arrernte in Central Australia

Diane Austin-Broos, University of Sydney

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

A self-proclaimed ‘hybrid economy skeptic’, Diane Austin-Broos offers some reasons why the Western Arrernte’s Community Development Employment Project became ‘welfare’ rather than ‘workfare.’

economy, indigenous, work

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Between locals: Interpersonal histories and the Papunya art movement

Peter Thorley and Andy Greenslade, National Museum of Australia

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Thorley and Greenslade consider Papunya Tula during the 1970s, as Indigenous art became recognised as fine art, and remote markets developed, shaping the art movement. But local markets persisted, and their effect on the movement warrants further study.

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art, economy, indigenous, industry

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‘Afghans’ and Aborigines in Central Australia

Philip Jones, South Australian Museum

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Philip Jones explores the relations between Aboriginal people and ‘Afghans’, whose camel trains linked Central Australian outposts with supply centres and markets in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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colonial, economy, indigenous, industry

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Indigenous modes of exchange and participation in the Indonesian trepang industry

Daryl Guse, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Daryl Guse discusses archaeological research in north-western Arnhem Land that indicates early Indigenous participation in and trade with the Indonesian trepang maritime industry, and the adaptability of Indigenous coastal communities.

economy, food, indigenous

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