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Necessity entrepreneurship within a dominant society

Dennis Foley, University of Newcastle

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Dennis Foley describes two kinds of Indigenous entrepreneur: ‘opportunists’ who seize a concept and use their networks to embark on a business venture, and those who lack capital, so out of ‘necessity’ must adapt to dominant culture to provide the basics.

economy, indigenous, politics

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Policy mismatch and Aboriginal art centres: The tension between economic independence and community development

Gretchen Stolte, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Gretchen Stolte talks about Aboriginal art centres, arguing that a centre should be funded in accordance with its engagement with the community, because the more community-building it does, the less money it can make.

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economy, indigenous

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Before the mission station: The incorporation of settlers into a seasonal economy

John White, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 10 November 2009

Exploring intercultural relations in the period of pastoral expansion, John White says that working relationships based on reciprocity enabled Aboriginal people to factor settlers into their seasonal movements and carve out a niche in the settler economy.

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colonial, economy, indigenous

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Settler economies and Indigenous encounters

Christopher Lloyd, University of New England

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Christopher Lloyd explores and discusses the development, meaning, use, and usefulness of the concepts of ‘conquest’, ‘hybridity’, and ‘production regimes’ in the field of research into the history of settler/Indigenous relations and their consequences.

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conflict, economy, indigenous, politics

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Small Aboriginal community incorporations on shifting ground: A perspective from Ltyentye Apurte Community, Santa Teresa

Judy Lovell, University of Canberra (paper co-authored by Camille Dobson and Veronica Dobson)

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Judy Lovell describes Keringke Arts Aboriginal Incorporation and the effect of the ‘Emergency Response’ and government reforms; and Ntwerle Aboriginal Incorporation, a new initiative promoting and hosting whitefella leadership training programs.

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art, economy, indigenous, industry

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The economy of shells: A history of Aboriginal women at La Perouse making shellwork for sale

Maria Nugent, National Museum of Australia

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Maria Nugent explores the 130-year-long practice of shell-working by Aboriginal women at La Perouse in Sydney’s south, and how the makers have been able to create or find new markets by adapting their products to appeal to new customers.

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art, economy, indigenous, industry, women

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‘Always Anangu’ – always enterprising’

Alan O'Connor, University of South Australia

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Alan O’Connor examines Anangu involvement in economic life from early records pre-contact, through the establishment of the mission Ernabella, in 1937, when dingo scalps were traded for flour, tea and sugar, to the enterprises that emerged in the 1970s.

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economy, indigenous, industry

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Albert Namatjira, camels and cars: the evolution of Indigenous art economies in Central Australia

Alison French, Australian National University

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Alison French considers the role of camels and cars in the evolution of Namatjira’s art and the ways they fostered and sustained both the practice of art as well as myths and stereotypes that position artists and the economic values of their art.

art, economy, indigenous

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Between locals: Interpersonal histories and the Papunya art movement

Peter Thorley and Andy Greenslade, National Museum of Australia

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Thorley and Greenslade consider Papunya Tula during the 1970s, as Indigenous art became recognised as fine art, and remote markets developed, shaping the art movement. But local markets persisted, and their effect on the movement warrants further study.

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art, economy, indigenous, industry

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‘Afghans’ and Aborigines in Central Australia

Philip Jones, South Australian Museum

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies conference, 9 November 2009

Philip Jones explores the relations between Aboriginal people and ‘Afghans’, whose camel trains linked Central Australian outposts with supply centres and markets in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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colonial, economy, indigenous, industry

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